The South Gippsland Landcare Network (SGLN) was formed in 1995 and today is made up of 16 groups and over 400 families who manage and farm the land. The success of the Network is due to the inspiring contributions made by the passionate individuals and volunteers.

The South Gippsland Landcare Network stretches from Mt Best to Mt Lyal, and along the prom coast. It’s made up of 16 local groups working to preserve and protect the natural environment, while also enhancing the long-term sustainability of farming in this part of Victoria. We’re proud to operate across both Bunurong and Gunaikurnai country, and to recognise the rich history embedded in this land we now share.

Our members are primary producers, hobby farmers, tree changers, backyard gardeners and environmentalists of all sorts – a diverse group that finds common ground in caring for the land and building community.

Our Goals:

  • Improving the environment & embracing sustainable food & fibre production.

    Achieved by working in partnership with the community, businesses & government agencies

  • Caring for land of any size.

    The South Gippsland Landcare Network offers a range of programs to suit lifestyle properties or large farming enterprises

The Network area covers 270,000 ha and is bordered by the Strzelecki Ranges to the north and the Bass Strait to the south. The south-western half of the catchment is part of the Gippsland Plains bioregion, characterized by lowland coastal and alluvial plains with gentle undulating terrain which rises to meet the Strzelecki Ranges to the north.

Thanks to its high rainfall and productive soils, the South Gippsland area is an important dry-land agricultural region, with strong dairy and beef industries. The regional townships of Leongatha, Meeniyan, Poowong, Foster, Fish Creek, Mirboo North, Loch and Nyora are located in the Network.

The area also has high environmental value with large patches of coastal park, remnant vegetation and several significant waterways such as the Bass, Tarwin and Franklin Rivers. These rivers contribute to several important wetlands including Anderson Inlet and the RAMSAR protected Westernport Bay and Corner Inlet.

SGLN is a not-for-profit organisation governed by a board. The board is responsible for the overall governance of the organisation: the leadership and supervision of the organisation’s affairs. The board’s primary role is to protect and enhance the value of the organisation for the benefit of its members and its mission.

Management and secretarial duties are fulfilled by a Landcare Facilitator. Projects are delivered by SGLN Project Officer/s and external contractors as required.

SGLN Facebook

South Gippsland Landcare Network

We acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the land on which we work and meet. The South Gippsland Landcare Network stretches from Mt Best to Mt Lyal, and along the prom coast. It’s made up of 16 local groups working to preserve and protect the natural environment, while also enhancing the long-term sustainability of farming in this part of Victoria. We’re proud to work across both Bunurong and Gunaikurnai country, and to recognise the rich history embedded in this land we now share. As a network, we’re a diverse group – made up of primary producers, hobby farmers, tree changers, backyard gardeners and environmentalists of all sorts. This page is part of our community, so we welcome feedback and input from anyone who’s interested in having a voice here.
South Gippsland Landcare Network
South Gippsland Landcare Network
Confused about Acknowledgement of Country?

A Welcome to Country or an Acknowledgement of Traditional Owners recognises the continuing connection of Aboriginal Traditional Owners to their Country.

This map (https://achris.vic.gov.au/weave/wca.html) allows you to find out who the formally recognised Traditional Owners are for an area.

1. Search for a location
Enter a location (such as a street address or the name of a town) into the search window located on the toolbar above the map.

2. Hover and click on the map
When the map has navigated to that location, hover your mouse cursor, and left click, over the location where your event or function will be held. It will display the name of the formally recognised Traditional Owners of the area.

This name can be referred to for Acknowledgements.

Click on the map to bring up information about the formally recognised Traditional Owner corporation and the Traditional Owners represented for Acknowledgements.

3. Click on the links provided to contact the formally recognised Traditional Owners corporation
Links are provided (where available) which take you to the corporation’s website to arrange a Welcome to Country ceremony.

4. Show formally recognised Traditional Owners boundaries (if desired)
Click this button on the toolbar to toggle on/off map layers that show the formally recognised Traditional Owners boundaries.
South Gippsland Landcare Network
South Gippsland Landcare Network
This SGLN publication is relevant to all areas lucky enough to have koalas. It's an easy read with some great photos and tips for living compatibly with these much-loved marsupials.
https://www.sgln.net.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/SGLN_Koala_Brochure.pdf
South Gippsland Landcare Network
South Gippsland Landcare Network
Working bee at Hamann's Bush Reserve

Members of the Arawata and Nerrena Tarwin Valley Landcare Groups combined forces last month at a twilight working bee at Hamann's Bush Reserve in Leongatha North.

The main purpose of the working bee was to tackle the problem of sweet pittosporum (Pittosporum undulatum). Although native to Australia, sweet pittosporum is a serious problem when it extends outside its natural range. As well as creating a dense canopy, it releases chemical inhibitors (saponins) which prevent indigenous plants from growing beneath. It is also highly flammable.

There was a lot of discussion at the working bee about the best way(s) to kill sweet pittosporum. The following methods were used:

Remove by hand
Hand removal is only recommended for very small plants, ensure the root system is removed and the disturbed area is covered over with mulch to reduce spread of other weeds.

Cut and paint
Cut plants off at ground level and immediately paint the stump with an undiluted glyphosate based product. This is useful for larger seedlings that are too hard to hand pull but should not be attempted on trees with trunks greater than 50mm as they are likely to resprout.

Drill and fill
Drill holes 2-3 cm deep and about 5 cm apart, at the base of the trunk. Fill the hole immediately with an undiluted glyphosate-based product. This technique should be used for plants greater than 50mm in diameter and is best done in active growth stage which is late spring and mid-autumn.

Please send in photos of your get-togethers to admin@sgln.net.au - we'd love to publish them.

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